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Department of Employee Relations  Ann Schluter, Commissioner

Mission: Making a positive impact on state managers and employees… for the benefit of all Minnesotans.

The Department of Employee Relations is the central agency for the human resource system of the State of Minnesota. Working together with the human resource operations of the State of Minnesota agencies, the Department of Employee Relations is committed to the continuous improvement of human resource products and services that support state government in providing exceptional service to all citizens.

See a profile of the Department of Employee Relations at: http://www.budget.state.mn.us/profiles/g24.shtml


Goal: Advanced human resource products and services are delivered to managers, employees and job applicants in effective and efficient ways.

Median length of time-to-fill vacancies

Percentage of positions filled through the new streamlined hiring process

Percentage of applications/resumes completed/received online

Average number of applications per job seeker

Percentage of employees using online insurance and benefits enrollment

Savings from the new Advantage Health Plan medical coverage

Reported State Workers' Compensation claims paid per 100 full-time equivalent employees.

Average sick leave used per employee by usage type (indicator under construction)

Goal: State agency Managers, supervisors, and HR staff, employees and applicants report increased satisfaction with employer as is evidenced through human resource services, products and systems.

Voluntary employee turnover compared to national average

Percentage of unlimited * employees leaving state service after only a short-term of employment

Job satisfaction as measured by employee surveys (indicators under construction)

Satisfaction with the State's human resources system as measured by an employee survey (indicator under construction)

Goal: A workforce that is representative of the relevant labor market ensures that the state benefits from the abilities of all Minnesotans.

Percentage of protected-group members in the state workforce, as compared to the relevant labor market

By occupational group, the percentage of protected-group members in the state workforce, as compared to the relevant labor market (indicator under construction)

 

 

Median length of time-to-fill vacancies.

Graph depicting the median length of time to fill vacancies.

Note: Filling a vacancy in a timely manner is important to ensure continuity of service to state agency clients as well as to encourage the best employee candidates to remain interested in state employment.  For that reason DOER, in March of 2002, after several years of in-depth preparation and training for agencies, inaugurated a streamlined hiring process.  The new process has greatly automated and sped up DOER’s portion of the hiring process and provides the agencies with new technology based tools for expediting their employee selection process. The indicator illustrates the time saving impact of the new streamlined hiring process.  Although some portions of the hiring process are necessarily time-consuming, the average length of time-to-fill should significantly decrease as agencies make greater use of web-based hiring technology and the new streamlined hiring process to improve efficiency.  Agency time-to-fill is also affected by management decisions about when to fill a vacancy based on budgets and internal workforce efficiencies.

Total “time-to-fill” tracks the interval that begins with receipt of an agency’s “Request to Employ” and ends with an “Employee Start Date.”

*The 1999 median length of "time-to-fill" for employers nationwide is 51 days. Source: Saratoga Institute.

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Percentage of positions filled through the new streamlined hiring system.

Graph depicting the percentage of positions filled via the streamlined hiring process.

Note: To ensure the State has sufficient candidates available for the staffing needs of the agencies, the Department has streamlined its selection system.  Integral to this change is an increased use of computer technology, particularly Web-based technology, that allows agencies to rapidly post vacant positions and applicants to more easily apply for jobs.  The goal of 50% for 2003 reflects that agencies will continue to fill positions by authorized methods external to the new hiring system, for example: temporary and provisional appointments, non-competitive promotions, reallocations, transfers, demotions, unclassified positions, positions with exceptional qualifications, labor service, eligible lists, etc.  A number of these avenues will be incorporated into the new hiring system by 2004.

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Percentage of applications/resumes which are completed/received online

Graph depicting the percentage of applications/resumes completed/received online.

Note: Central to reducing the number of days to fill a vacant position is transitioning from a paper intensive system to one that makes maximum use of technology to match qualified applicants with the vacant positions.  Providing applicants the ability to submit on-line resumes/applications in addition to use of imaging of paper applications and resumes will greatly reduce the amount of manual, time intensive processes that were the hallmark of the State’s former selection system.

To go to the State’s Online Resume Builder and Application site, click here. top arrow pointing up

 

Average number of applications per job seeker.

Graph depicting the average number of applications per job seeker.

Note: In Fiscal Year 2000, almost 40,000 applications were submitted to DOER for job openings.  But all these applications came from a little over 23,000 individuals.  Similar levels of activity occurred in 2001 and into 2002.  Under the new, resume-based skill-matching hiring process, implemented in March 2002, applicants can apply for a variety of jobs via a single application & resume.  The final goal is a single application per job seeker that will allow applicants to become eligible in every opening for which they qualify.  This is desirable to both the employer (fewer applications state staff need to process and a greater, more diverse applicant pool) and the applicant (fewer applications to complete and more employment opportunities).

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Percentage of employees using online insurance and benefits enrollment

Graph depicting the percentage of employees using online insurance enrollment.

Note: Each year, the State spends hundreds of thousands of dollars in preparing and mailing printed materials for employee use in selecting benefit providers.  In addition, about 90 days were needed to enroll employees and for the plans to produce insurance cards.  On-line enrollment results in lower administrative costs and faster processing times both for the Department and its insurance providers.

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Savings from the new Advantage Health Plan medical coverage

Graph depicting reported state worker's comp claims per 100 employees.

Graph depicting people of color, as a percentage of total.
Graph depicting people of color, as a percentage of total.

Note: Beginning in 2002, the State implemented the new Advantage Health Plan, saving employees and agencies a total of $23 million in medical premiums in 2002 ($5.1 million savings in the employer share and $17.8 million savings in the employee share) and an estimated $35 million in 2003.  All cost figures for 2001 through 2003 are estimates because actual cost data is not final until at least 18 months after the end of each calendar year.

For more information on the new Advantage Health Plan, click here. top arrow pointing up

 

Reported State Workers' Compensation claims paid per 100 full-time equivalent employees.

Graph depicting reported state worker's comp claims per 100 employees.

Note: DOER’s newly formed Risk Management Unit seeks to analyze reported claims and develop and implement targeted interventions focusing on overexertion related injuries to reduce the frequency and severity of employee injuries.

Among Minnesota employers, in 1999, there were 8.2 paid claims per 100 full-time equivalent workers. (Workers’ Compensation System Report – 2000, Dept. of Labor and Industry)

For more information about the State’s Workers’ Compensation Program, click here.

For more information about DOER’s Total Absence/Risk Management Unit, click here.

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Average sick leave used per employee by usage type. (Indicator under construction)

 

Note:  Under construction.

For more information about DOER’s Total Absence/Risk Management Unit, click here. top arrow pointing up

 

Voluntary employee turnover compared to national state average

Graph depicting voluntary employee turnover percentages.

Note: Employee turnover is one indicator of employee satisfaction, and employee satisfaction is strongly linked to employee productivity.  Employee turnover is costly to an employer; for example, there are the costs of recruitment, selection, hiring and training, as well as the loss of productivity to an agency’s clients or customers.  To be sure, some turnover is healthy; new employees bring new ideas, talents and energy to the workplace.  Employee turnover for the public sector is typically lower than for the private sector.  Additionally, Minnesota state government benefits from a turnover rate that is even lower than that of most other states.  Low employee turnover provides a general indication that employees are satisfied with state employment.

The 1999 average state employee turnover rate for all states is 8.1%  Source: Governing Magazine, February 2001.

For more detailed information on Voluntary Turnover click here and for Department specific turnover statistics click here.

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Percent of unlimited* employees leaving state service after only a short-term of employment.

Graph depicting short-term turnover percentage among unlimited employees.

Note: The employer makes a significant investment in the selection and training of a new employee.  Employee resignations commonly cause turmoil in the work place in terms of work disruption, change in employee morale, and loss of productivity.

A two year time frame was calculated for the above indicators.  For example: in Fiscal Year 1997, 11.85% of unlimited* employees with less than two years of service voluntarily resigned their positions.

* "Unlimited" means an appointment for which there is no specified maximum duration (MN Statutes 2001, 43A.02, Subd. 40)

For more detailed information on Short-term Turnover, click here. top arrow pointing up

 

Job satisfaction as measured by employee surveys (Indicators under construction)

By December 31, 2002, the Department of Employee Relations will develop and administer surveys that will help us learn:

  1. Why employees initially come to work for the State of Minnesota.
  2. Why employees continue to work for the State of Minnesota.
  3. Why employees who exit chose to leave the State of Minnesota.

Note: DOER is developing survey instruments to measure employee job satisfaction. Aspects to be surveyed may include: job satisfaction, satisfaction with the compensation and benefits package, satisfaction with training and development opportunities, and satisfaction with management practices and work environment. Survey results will be useful in assessing the general stability of the workforce, making recommendations for improving state employment, as well as providing external comparisons.

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Satisfaction with the State's human resources system as measured by an employee survey (indicator under construction)

By December 31, 2002, the Department of Employee Relations will develop and administer a survey that will help us learn about satisfaction with the State's human resources system.

Note: DOER is developing a survey to measure satisfaction with the State's human resources system. Questions may address degree of satisfaction with:

  • compensation and benefits packages,
  • training and development opportunities,
  • management practices
  • work environment, and
  • overall satisfaction with the state's human resources system.

Survey results will be useful in assessing the general stability of the workforce and in determining areas where the state can improve the human resources services it provides to its employees.

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Percentage of protected-group members in the state workforce, as compared to the relevant labor market

Graph depicting people of color, as a percentage of total.

Graph depicting women, as a percentage of total.

Graph depicting people with disabilities, as a percentage of total.

Note: The state is committed to the development and maintenance of inclusive employment practices.  A workplace that respects and values the productivity and effective contributions of a diverse workforce ensures that executive branch positions are equally accessible to all qualified persons.  The state reaps the benefits from the abilities and talents of qualified members of protected groups (women, minorities and individuals with disabilities.)  A key measure is the comparison of the percentage of protected-group members in the state workforce to the relevant labor market (those available and willing to work).  The State’s goal is to have parity between its workforce and the labor market.

For more information about DOER’s Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity, click here. top arrow pointing up

 

By occupational group, the percentage of protected-group members in the state workforce, as compared to the relevant labor market (indicator under construction)

By Early 2003, the Department of Employee Relations will publish data on protected groups in the state workforce, as compared to the Minnesota labor market -- by occupational group.

Note: The U.S. Census Bureau provides data to establish the availability of protected-group members in the relevant labor market. The State compares this data to its workforce data to determine occupational groups-such as professional, office-clerical, and skilled craft-in which the state, or an individual agency, has a workforce disparity. Data from the 2000 U.S. Census concerning the relevant labor market in occupational groups will be available in early 2003. This indicator will be completed at that time.

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